Special Event- Dealing with Difficult People

 

 

 

gomchen

Through Training in Mindfulness & Meditation

Thursday 15 March | 7-8.30pm

£10 | £7 members | Free for benefactors

with International Guest Teacher Gen Kelsang Gomchen

At Trades Hall of Glasgow, 85 Glassford St, G1 1UH

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About the Event

One of our greatest sources of stress, anxiety and unhappiness lies within our difficult relationships with others. Through meditation and mindfulness we can learn how to keep our cool and respond in a more constructive way.

In this way we let go of the anxiety and stress responses which are currently our habit and we can even transform these experiences into opportunities for growth, establishing a foundation for more stable, satisfying relationships. These teachings are relevant to all types of relationships- work, family, friends or romantic.

 

About the Teacher

Previously a teacher in Glasgow and the principal teacher at KMC Edinburgh, Gen Kelsang Gomchen has taught extensively throughout the UK and is now the principal teacher at KMC London. He is known for his ability to inspire others through sincere practice and to present the deeper meanings of Buddha’s teachings in a way that is practical and relevant.

 

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* Please note to secure your seat for this Special Event, payment in full must be made in advance

Click on the link below to book your place with Paypal or Card Payments. Seats will only be reserved when full payment is made even for members, as we are expecting this to be a sell-out event. Benefactors also need to book even though the event is included in their membership cost.

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For just £30 per month, you can become a member of Kadampa Meditation Centre Glasgow, and enjoy unlimited courses and classes included in your monthly payment (and 30% off special events).

If you benefit from what we do and wish to support the development and growth of the centre so that others can benefit too, you can also become a benefactor member.

For more information on our membership options and/or to become a member today click here

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What People Say about Meditating at Kadampa Meditation Centre Glasgow

Meditation has changed my life and that of my family- Pauline

I always leave feeling calm and refreshed- I would urge anyone to give meditation a try- Jennifer

This is where I take my mind to get fixed during the week-  Paul

 

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What is Meditation and Mindfulness?

Meditation is a way of calming the mind and developing a more positive approach to life. The purpose of meditation is to make our mind calm and peaceful. In Buddhism, meditation is regarded as the principal tool for personal development.  You don’t need to be Buddhist to use this simple and highly effective tool.  It enables us first to understand our mind and then to begin to control it.

Even practising meditation for just 10 minutes every day, we can discover for ourself the inner peace and happiness that naturally arises when our mind becomes still.  Even 10 minutes a week can be enough to notice a change.

This feeling of inner peace helps us to cope with the busyness and difficulties of daily life. We will find that many of our usual problems will fall away and we will feel warm and well disposed towards other people thereby improving our relationships.

If we train in meditation, our mind will be free from worries and mental discomfort and gradually we will become more and more peaceful, and we will experience a purer and purer form of happiness. Eventually, we will be able to stay happy all the time, even in the most difficult circumstances.

Usually we find it difficult to control our mind. It seems as if our mind is like a balloon in the wind – blown here and there by external circumstances. If things go well, our mind is happy, but if they go badly, it immediately becomes unhappy.

Such fluctuations of mood arise because we are too closely involved in the external situation. We are like a child making a sand castle who is excited when it is first made, but who becomes upset when it is destroyed by the incoming tide.

This is where mindfulness comes in. The term ‘mindfulness’ is a translation of the Tibetan word ‘drenpa’, which can also be translated as ‘remembering’ or ‘recollecting’. Mindfulness is the heart of meditation.  Training in mindfulness is not just watching our mind, but actively improving our mind by keeping it focused on a positive object. We use the sense of peace, stability, calm and focus that we have experienced in our formal meditation practice as an anchor to go back to during the day.  Using mindfulness we learn how to watch what is happening in our mind moment by moment and like a master yachtsman using the winds to his advantage we harness the positivity in our minds and use it to propel us into happy states of mind more of the time and we learn to let go or turn away from our harmful unhappy and negative states of mind.  In this way we remember, or are mindful of a positive thought or state of mind throughout the day.

By training in meditation and mindfulness, we create an inner space and clarity that enables us to control our mind regardless of the external circumstances. Gradually we develop mental equilibrium, a balanced mind that is happy all the time, rather than an unbalanced mind that oscillates between the extremes of excitement and despondency.

If we train in meditation and mindfulness systematically, eventually we will be able to eradicate from our mind the delusions that are the causes of all our problems and suffering. In this way, we will come to experience a permanent inner peace, known as ‘liberation’ or ‘nirvana’. Then, day and night in life after life, we will experience only peace and happiness.